ON HONEST AND RESPONSIBLE DIALOGUE ON RACE RELATIONS IN AMERICA (CONCLUSION)

Our Founder and Editor, Mr. Chinedu Ezeocha with former World Bank President, Bob Zoellick at the CATO Institute’s 29th Annual Monetary Conference held at CATO Institute’s Building, Washington DC. November 16, 2011.
Our Founder and Editor, Mr. Chinedu Ezeocha with former World Bank President, Bob Zoellick at the CATO Institute’s 29th Annual Monetary Conference held at CATO Institute’s Building, Washington DC. November 16, 2011.

Selma (2014) the movie is out. Snowstorm barrels into the Northeast. And the U.S. is not expected to fault Darrel Wilson, the Ferguson police officer that killed Michael Brown last August. From the Feds’ decision, it is fair to assume that there could be some similarities in the findings of the Feds and that of the St Louis County, Missouri on what actually happened in the altercation between Michael Brown and Officer Wilson.  At the mouth of two witnesses, or at the mouth of three witnesses, shall a matter be established. That is justice. And that is a closed chapter.

Meanwhile, once upon a time in the animal kingdom, a day came when all animals were reporting to the town hall for a general meeting. But the hen, which felt it had more ‘important’ things to do, absented herself from the meeting but pledged to abide by every decision reached at the meeting by those who attended the meeting. At the meeting, a decision was reached that a ceremony will take place and that the hen and her chicks will be killed to provide the meat for refreshment at the ceremony. The hen wasn’t present to object to that decision because she refused to attend the meeting. And as she pledged, she had to abide by the decision reached by others at the meeting.

Now, when you visit most of the think tanks in the District of Columbia, New York City, Chicago, and California, you will discover that the presence of African-Americans are close to non-existent in our country’s apex policy-making institutions where policies that govern this country are hatched. Some pockets of the Black people you will see walking the  ‘corridors of power’ are mostly interns from Africa who are studying government-related courses here in the U.S.

Same goes for all the departments of the federal government at the levels of relevance where folks effect policy decisions. Most workers of African-American derivation you will see at these federal government agencies work administrative and general services jobs. And not top level positions where policies that govern the domestic politics of the United States are formulated. And same also go for state and local governments. And that, my people is a sad and hard fact.

Why so?

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REMINISCING AMERICA’S FOREIGN POLICY

Secretary of State John Kerry delivers remarks on U.S.-China relations at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, D.C., on November 4, 2014. State Dept Image / Nov 04, 2014.

 

By Chinedu Ezeocha for Ezeocha Post
Originally Published on Wednesday April 30, 2014 at 1:37 AM CT

 There used to be a time, not too long ago, that if an American walks into a bar in a foreign country and introduces himself as such, that people naturally warm up to him. There existed a happy combination of feelings of awe and affection towards the person, not because of the person’s built, beauty, or flamboyancy, but simply because he represents America, a global force for good; America, the beacon of hope for the world; America, the publicly dismissed but privately acknowledged world police that guarantees global stability and protects the vulnerable. Imperfect and often accused of pursuing realist’s national interests anytime it stages humanitarian intervention in any foreign land, yet there existed no doubt in the mind of majority of the world’s population what America stands for because America projects, protects, and defend the Universal Human Rights.

In Nigeria of the 90s, at the peak of the human rights abuses and violence that plagued the country at the hands of the military junta, people, of which I was one, hopefully believed that America will intervene with its unrivalled military might, salvage the situation and steer the country on the right course. America didn’t intervene militarily in Nigeria. The deciders determined that apples served on a plate by Brazilian models would rid Nigeria of a dictator. But that hopeful believe in America as agent of democracy and in America’s compassion towards the oppressed was shared among citizens of most troubled spots worldwide.

But gone are the days. America now seem ordinary. And no longer exceptional. Gone are the days.

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